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\r\n Annie Hartnett<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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I didn\u2019t start writing\u2014really writing\u2014until my final year in college, when I was in a creative writing class that I\u2019d just taken for kicks. The professor assigned The Anchor Book of New American Short Stories (edited by Ben Marcus) and I was just bowled over by it. I thought, if I could write stories like […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n Kate Quinn<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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I can’t remember a time I wasn’t writing. I wrote my first short story at seven (front and back of a blank piece of typing paper, straggling pencil block print) and my first book at ten (121 typed and double-spaced pages of pure awful!) I wrote as a high schooler, as a college student balancing […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n James D. Shipman<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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I restarted my writing at age forty when the stark realization of my own mortality washed over me. I had published a few short stories and poems in college but children and my career grabbed the reins from me in my thirties and I wasn\u2019t able to pursue my passion. Sitting back on my fortieth […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n Charles Todd<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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Charles and Caroline Todd are a mother-and-son writing team who publish under the name\u00a0\u201cCharles Todd.” Writing is like an addiction–characters and settings inhabit your head, whether you are willing or not, and at some point must be put down on paper and investigated. Oddly enough this is true of both of us, which makes writing […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n Carolyn Miller<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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I\u2019ve always been an avid reader, and for years enjoyed dreaming up scenarios for the people I\u2019d read about in the news, wondering about their \u2018why\u2019 \u2013 the reasons that motivate them to action. After my husband\u2019s conclusion of church leadership, I began writing as a form of catharsis, a way of dealing with the […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n Katelin Maloney<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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I didn\u2019t choose to write my first novel. The story chose me. I was teaching Economics at a local university and one night I dreamed a vivid and powerful dream. The story haunted me, and I couldn\u2019t get it out of my head. After weeks of thinking about this story, details and characters grew in […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n Sabrina Flynn<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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I would not wish my childhood on anyone. Shocked into a dissociative fog at fourteen, I retreated deep inside myself. Quiet, withdrawn, drifting, I was numb to the world\u2014to the sting of a match and the rake of nails. I lived in my imagination for years. The people in my mind were more real to […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n Rae Meadows<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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As a child, I wasn\u2019t a big reader and I never imagined myself a writer. In college, kids slept overnight outside the English department to get coveted spots in fiction workshops. I never even considered it. Writing fiction seemed opaque and scary to me. But it was in college that I began to read, really […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n T.J. Brearton<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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I got a good dose of movies and books as a kid, things that fueled my creative urge. I\u2019ve written to entertain myself, to share consciousness, to keep from going crazy, to protest social inequality \u2014 all sorts of reasons \u2014 but I\u2019ve learned that my desire to make a career out of writing has […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n Sarah Porter<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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Words held incantatory power when I was a child, and it was a power wielded primarily by adults. They could express any stance, any emotion, using words unknown to me; they could win any argument. I can still remember the shock of hearing identify for the first time, and reminiscent. The revelation\u2014that a few quick […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n Talia Carner<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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Stories find me, pull me, and don\u2019t let me go until I have explored them through 100,000 words (or more). That is what happened after I was caught in the 1993 uprising of the Russian parliament against Boris Yeltsin, where I taught women entrepreneurial skills. Their valiant struggle to gain a foothold in a strange, […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n Lydia Kang<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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I\u2019m a physician by trade. For most of my life, I was really good at science, and that\u2019s what I did. I didn\u2019t give myself permission to write until only very recently, after I\u2019d been a doctor for fifteen years. Now? I can\u2019t stop. When I encounter an idea that proves to be unforgettable, I […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n Kimberly Belle<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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I\u2019m not one of those writers who penned her first novel in crayon. Sure, I\u2019ve always been a voracious reader, but actually being the one to think up all those words? The idea terrified me. Beyond the shaky economics of the profession, writing is a humbling, unnerving, uncomfortable thing. Sending one of my stories out […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n Natalie Meg Evans<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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I have written all my life. When she died, my mother had my first \u2018novel\u2019 tucked in her purse \u2014 three pages about a robin who left home to find food for his family and never came back. I was four when I wrote it and I can only imagine that a diet of traditional, […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n Maria Duffy<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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I\u2019ve always loved to write. From the time I could hold a pen, I was scribbling words, which were largely illegible but they were stories in my head. As I grew older, I loved to people-watch and listen in on conversations whenever I could. Something as simple as a woman in front of me in […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n Jonathan Escoffery<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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I first fell in love with story\u2019s ability to transport, to expand the borders of my reality. I recall crouching beneath my parents’ kitchen counter as a child, losing Sunday afternoons reading. That words printed between book covers could take me to far off worlds, on journeys that left me forever changed, was, to me, […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n Lynne M. Spreen<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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I was always a writer; always kept a journal. I\u2019m sixty-three and I have journals going way back. The oldest was written in the hospital when my son was born. He\u2019s forty now. After my first divorce I wrote about the house I bought on my own, a chicken coop on a busy highway in […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n Meg Mitchell Moore<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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In seventh grade my English class was assigned to write a short story of some sort. I don\u2019t remember what the specific parameters were. I\u2019m not sure if they were all supposed to be horror stories, but I do remember that I penned something pretty gruesome about a hit-and-run accident on a lonely road one […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n Renee Macalino Rutledge<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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One of my favorite quotes is: \u201cThe creative adult is the child who has survived,\u201d by Ursula K. Le Guin. When you are a child, everything is new, and you respond to it without artifice. It can be more difficult to maintain that sense of wonder and curiosity as you get older, so people push […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n Ann Y.K. Choi<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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I grew up listening to jokes about corner variety stores being run by Korean immigrant families. But that\u2019s what my family did for 30 years in Canada. Now that many of us have grown up and left our family-run businesses to do other things, I felt compelled to share stories from behind the store counter. […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n Panio Gianopoulos<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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I don\u2019t often ask myself this question. The question I usually find myself asking is Why don\u2019t I write? Or even more commonly, why didn\u2019t I write? Why didn\u2019t I write this morning when our puppy woke me up at dawn, scratching and whining at its crate door, and after putting him outside with his […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n Ayelet Tsabari<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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I began writing before I knew how to write. As a child, I used to draw comic strips and narrate the story to my siblings and cousins. As soon as I learned the alphabet I began writing stories, poems, plays and scripts. I did not choose writing; it had chosen me, presented itself to me […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n Georgia Hunter<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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Looking back, I suppose you could say that writing has always been a part of my ethos. One of my earliest memories is falling asleep to the sound of my father tapping away on his Olivetti typewriter as he composed his first novel from his office in our small Massachusetts home in the woods. I […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n Mark Wisniewski<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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When I was a kid, the best stories came through my ears, usually during meals\u2014often\u00a0on “happy”\u00a0holidays\u00a0like the Fourth of July. There were certain old relatives who excelled at holding court as it were. I was curious and shy, so I’d listen demurely. Then came school, where reading and writing happened\u00a0and it\u00a0struck me to try to […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n Sonia Taitz<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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I have always been in love with the power of language. As the daughter of refugees, I spoke two: Yiddish and English. It amazed me that different sounds and syllables could mean the same thing, yet carry flavors, nuances, of their origins. I also marveled at the power of the written word. I\u2019d read the […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n Leah DeCesare<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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Since the time I was very young I wanted to be a writer. I would write poems and stories and even sent off the first five chapters of a novel to a Big Five New York City publishing house when I was ten years old. That was my first badge as a writer – a […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>

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\r\n Chris Holm<\/a>\r\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n\t\t
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Before I became a writer, I was on another path entirely, working toward a PhD in infectious disease research. It was interesting enough, I guess, but I was unfulfilled. Science wasn\u2019t so much my passion as it was something I fell into. Early aptitude led to advanced placement, which in turn led me to an […]<\/p>\n <\/div>\r\n \r\n <\/div>\r\n<\/div>